Tag Archives: New York City

Confirmed: Samsung global will announce the Galaxy S5 later this month. report :-akki


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Samsung recently sent out invitations to a press conference that will take place ahead of the annual Mobile World Congress trade show in Barcelona later this month. Dubbed Unpacked 5, the presence of “5″ in the event’s title caused the tech press to jump to the conclusion that Samsung’s next flagship phone, the Galaxy S5, would debut at the event. That notion remained speculation until Wednesday morning, when The New York Times confirmed that Samsung’s new Galaxy S5 will in fact debut at the company’s February 24th press conference.

The report also notes that Samsung should and will shift its focus away from gimmicky features in the Galaxy S5.

Hmm, where have we heard that advice before?

Samsung’s new Galaxy S5 is expected to feature a new AMOLED display with 2K resolution that measures about 5.2 inches diagonally. Reports also suggest the phone will include a quad-core Snapdragon processor or an octa-core Samsung Exynos chipset depending on region, 3GB of RAM, 32 or 64GB of memory, a 16-megapixel camera, a 3.2-megapixel front-facing camera, a 3,200 mAh battery and Android 4.4 KitKat.

The NYT also says that Samsung will unveil a sequel to the Galaxy Gear smartwatch during its event later this month.

SATYA NADELLA MIGHT BE BAD NEWS FOR YOUNG INDIA……. HERE’S WHY


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only the third CEO in 38-year-old Microsoft’s lifetime, 47-year-old Satya Nadella is being lauded by the American and Indian press alike.. I am, in fact, sweating a couple of jugs for what Satya’s elevation as Microsoft’s new CEO will amount to in a few weeks.

Here is my biggest grief. Satya Nadella will be used as an example by Indian parents to tell their children that engineering is not dead and can indeed take you places such as the CEO’s chair at Microsoft. At a time when the creative arts need a fillip and our historical heritage as well as cultural mores needs additional modes of expression, this is a dangerous thing.

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Wonder what the new CEO will be taking home? According to a recent regulatory filing by Microsoft with the SEC, Nadella’s annual salary has been increased to $1.2 million.

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As a professor of journalism at a top Mumbai college, I have had parents come up to me confidentially and tell me that they did not approve of their wards take up subjects as journalism, advertising, PR etc. To them, these are not real streams of education but more of a hobby class that needs to be tolerated for a finite amount of time. Most parents secretly hope their kids will realise their folly and go back to engineering just as they had envisioned. It is only when realisation finally hits that they come and ask me about the prospects in these new fields.

Satya’s bachelor of engineering in electronics and communication degree from Manipal Institute of Technology and MS in Computer Science from the University of Milwaukee-Wisconsin as well as an MBA from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business will be the new benchmark for teenagers hereon.

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If only Satya himself had something truly revolutionary with his own career then things might have been a whole lot different. In fact, he could have been the new poster boy of a young India hungry for success across the world. But Satya himself chose to lead a simple and staid life, putting in the years at Microsoft by putting in all his hard work before his elevation to CEO. That is not path-breaking but a routine way of getting to the top.

You could call my analysis baseless paranoia and I would gladly like to be proved wrong but history is a better teacher than we credit it for. When I was studying in the last decade, almost 90 percent of my schoolmates went to engineering colleges after their junior college. Most were just following the family tradition and did not know what to make of their careers while doing engineering.

A good student went to a university in California to study computer science but is now working for his father’s interior design company after dropping out mid-way through the course. A brilliant student went into depression after he could not cope with the accumulated KTs and non-performance and dropped out to take banking exams. They were driven by their parents to emulate another Indian who had made headlines by joining hands with Microsoft to offer a revolutionary email service to the world called Hotmail. His name was Sabeer Bhatia.

The new generation of students have a new talisman to emulate now and his name is Satya Nadella.

NASA wants to put your name on a spacecraft headed to an asteroid


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NASA wants to put your name on a spacecraft headed to an asteroid

Forget those dime-a-dozen “name a star” gifts — wouldn’t you rather put your name on a spacecraft that advances human understanding? NASA certainly thinks you do. It’s teaming up with the Planetary Society to etch your name on chips inside its OSIRIS-REx probe, which will head toward the asteroid Bennu in 2016. While it’s doubtful that any aliens will read your microscopic claim to fame, it’ll certainly get the grand tour. The spacecraft will spend 500 days around the asteroid before heading back, and both the decommissioned vehicle as well as the returning sample capsule will have your ID. You can register your name today for free; just be prepared to wait years for the payoff.

Akshay mathur

Samsung Unveils Galaxy Note 3 Smartphone


English: Samsung Logo Suomi: Samsungin logo
English: Samsung Logo Suomi: Samsungin logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

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Samsung unveiled the third generation of its big-screen Note smartphone line, the Galaxy Note 3, at events in New York City’s Times Square and Berlin on Wednesday.

 

In evolving the Note line, Samsung says it’s attempted to make the phone “slimmer, lighter, faster, larger and better.” In addition to a larger screen with a “warm, textured” design, the Note 3 includes a new security system called Knox, which lets sensitive apps and data run in protected environment called the “container.”

 

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Galaxy Note 3 specs:

 

  • 151.2mmx79.2mmx8.3mm
  • 5.7-inch SuperAMOLED 1080p display with 368 ppi pixel density
  • 2.3GHz Snapdragon 800 processor, or 1.9GHz Samsung Exynos Octacore depending on market
  • Android 4.3
  • 13 megapixel rear camera, 2 megapixel front camera
  • 3GB RAM
  • 32 or 64GB storage
  • MicroSDXC card storage expansion
  • Bluetooth 4.0, WiFi 802.11ac, LTE Category 4
  • 3,200 mAh battery
  • LED/IR combo

 

No information on Galaxy Note 3 availability just yet beyond the September 25 date, and the official Samsung press materials around the launch says only that it’ll make it out to all major U.S. carriers “later this year.”

 

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The new Galaxy Note 3 features a design with extremely slimmer bezels and sharper angles on its rounded edges, marking a slight departure from Galaxy device design language thus far. It’s thinner than its predecessor and lighter (168g), despite offering a larger screen at 5.7-inches. It also offers more battery life than the Galaxy Note 2, and there’s a new and improved S Pen, too. Plus it supports faster, and more “seamless LTE” with multi-band support.

 

Samsung was emphasizing craftsmanship with the Galaxy Note, which features a stitched leather rear cover (available in black, white and pink). It also has a metallic rim running around the edge, and there’s a flip wallet accessory available in 10 different colors that also features a larger S View window cover for checking messages, making calls and accessing more info at a glance without having to activate the whole display.

 

How to Watch the Samsung Galaxy S IV Launch Online


We’re just hours away from the Samsung Galaxy S IV smartphone launch in New York City, the first time the Korean manufacturer will unveil a device in the U.S. and not overseas.

The event — which kicks off at 7:00 p.m. ET at Radio City Music Hall, just blocks away from competitor Apple’s flagship store — will be live streamed viaSamsung Mobile’s YouTube page and broadcast in Times Square. We’ve also embedded the stream above for your viewing pleasure.

For those following along on Twitter, Samsung is urging fans to use the hashtag #Unpacked, a reference to its much-hyped “Unpacked” marketing campaign.

There has been a lot of fanfare leading up to the event. First, it handed out paper invitations at Mobile World Congress conference last month — a move we’d expect from Apple — by drawing attention away from the show and onto its upcoming launch. Then, the company organized a flash mob.

There have also been teaser trailers and a tweet from Samsung of a picture of Galaxy S IV shown amid a shadowy background.

So what are we expecting? If leaked images and videos are any indication, we will likely see the device run on Android 4.2.2. and tout a quad-core 1.8GHz processor, 5-inch (1080p) display, 13-megapixel camera and 2GB of RAM. Features such as Floating Touch, Eye Scroll and SmartPause are also rumored, as well.

Image courtesy of Samsung

 

HERE COMES THE PLAYSTATION 4: SONY ANNOUNCES FEBRUARY 20TH PLAYSTATION EVENT [VIDEO]


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GAMING February 1, 2013 at 9:35 AM by 

The long, painful wait will soon be over. Sony (SNE) on Thursday evening circulated invitations to the press and bloggers for a press conference in New York City on February 20th. The company did not reveal any details, but it did confirm that we will “see the future” of PlayStation in a teaser video released alongside the invitations. Needless to say, we’re all expecting the company to unveil its next-generation PlayStation 4 video game console during the event, and multiple unnamed sources have reportedly confirmed as much to The Wall Street Journal. Recent rumors suggest the new PlayStation may launch in October with 16GB of RAM, 256GB of storage and 1080p HD resolution in 3D at 60 fps. BGR will be on hand covering the event live but in the meantime, Sony’s teaser video follows below.

 

Happy Diwali Message From Re – Elected President Obama


Diwali decoration
Diwali decoration (Photo credit: Piyush’s Space)

Our Politicians dnt even get each sec to think about Indians or to wish us other than corruption…such a stupid people these r…

Learn atleast from other countries…

Happy Diwali Obama Sir
From Indians

Apple iOS 6 vs. Google Android: Smart-phone navigation showdown


 

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On the smart-phone battleground, much attention has been paid recently to the quality of the free navigation app–Apple Maps–that comes with the new iPhone 5 (also part of the iOS 6 upgrade available for some other Apple devices). But there has been little focus on how well the app actually helps you get from Point A to Point B. Sure, there are lots of images of melted bridges circulating online, but how well does the app navigate?

We decided to find out by putting the iPhone 5 through our complete navigation tests, along with one of the latest Android phones with Google Maps navigation for comparison. (See our cell phone buying advice and Ratings.)

Last week we wrote that based on our first impressions of Apple Maps, we were disappointed. While it does offer Apple users built-in navigation with true turn-by-turn directions for the first time, it lacks some of the features and integration found in dedicated portable navigators and other navigation apps from Garmin, Navigon, and TomTom, such as reality view, lane assistance, exit guide, and multi-destination routing. Frankly, we expected the app to match the state of the art, and perhaps even advance it. But, it didn’t.

Having put it through the paces we subject each portable navigator to in our test program, our original criticisms remain. But having more thoroughly tested Apple Maps alongside a Samsung Galaxy S3 running Android 4.0.4 (Ice Cream Sandwich) with Google Maps, we have a more favorable opinion–certainly more favorable than comments and articles that we’ve been reading online.

Our evaluations were performed in the greater New York City area using two phones per platform, each on a different carrier. We found that both Apple Maps and Google Maps route effectively, providing clear guidance and great points-of-interest integration.

Overall, Apple impressed our staff with the graphic presentation for the interface, results, signage, and points of interest info. However, there is less customization throughout than Google–a mixed blessing when driving, where distractions can be dangerous. Google comes across as more business like and less fun.

Apple Maps is relatively streamlined, providing basic navigation guidance and limited travel information. The large display for next-turn information (which looks like a familiar green-and-white highway-sign) is easy to read at a glance, and it compensates for a map design that is harder to interpret than that on Android. We like the estimated time of arrival, remaining distance, and travel time countdown, although the text is so small, it is a greater aid for a passenger than the driver.

In terms of traffic reporting, Google gets the nod. The iPhone doesn’t highlight roads where traffic is flowing well, and the red dashes and yellow overlays of roads meant to indicate stopped or slow traffic aren’t nearly as vivid and readily interpreted as those in the Google app. Because Google shows freely-flowing traffic with bold green lines, it gives the impression that Google has more information, although in reality, it may often be a presentation choice rather than a data difference. That said, in the greater NYC area, Google seems to have more coverage, or at least provide more information.

Voice-recognition seemed comparable between the platforms, with each occasionally tripping over spoken commands. For both, the voiced instructions are clear and easily understood.

Both phones will accept calls while navigating, and they each require interaction with the screen while on call to return to full-screen navigation–a dangerous distraction. Both return to navigation automatically when a call ends. As with many facets, Google offers more customization here, for instance providing the ability for voice directions at varying volume levels while talking on the phone.

Addressing complaints
There has been much online grumbling about the iPhone app focused on weird 3D images, misplaced points of interest, and an absence of a Google-type “street view.” As shown on our previous post, we certainly have found instances of melting images in 3D mode, but more often than not, we found rather intriguing 3D representations that bring a map to life. The reality is, this is a novelty feature, not a component of navigation.

As for points of interest (POI), we programmed and traveled to numerous destinations. Almost all were found and successfully routed. Both platforms provided comparable information about restaurants and other attractions, with Apple using Yelp and Google partnering with Zagat. Each app provides contact information, reviews, and even user-submitted photos.

Where we did run into trouble on the iPhone was searching for a nearby train station. The system couldn’t identify the location by “train,” instead requiring a search for “Metro North”–a name that a visitor to the region may not be familiar with. This seems to be an issue with the search algorithm, rather than a map inaccuracy.

Apple uses maps from TomTom, a leading navigation company. We suspect many criticisms pointing to the map quality are misguided, as we have found TomTom to provide quality maps and guidance across multiple platforms. Instead, the fault may be Apple’s software applied to the TomTom data. (Apple agrees. Read: “Tim Cook Apologizes for Apple’s Maps.”)

Either way, in our experience thus far, this is a minor concern.

Bottom line:
Both the free Apple and Google navigation apps provide clear routing directions. Apple feels like a less-mature product. But as seen with the initial competing applications for the iPhone, we would expect updates to this new app over time–and Apple has promised as much. When getting down to the nitty gritty, Google provides a better overall package, but we feel that both provide a good solution for standard software. We expect the competition between the companies will benefit customers with ongoing improvements.